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Download Applied Atomic Collision Physics. Atmospheric Physics and by H.S.W. Massey (Eds.) PDF

By H.S.W. Massey (Eds.)

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1968) have made such measurements. Their results are shown in Fig. 1, and the extent of the disagreement between them is an indication of the difficulty of the experiments. The model adopted by Stolarski and Johnson is also shown. It is likely that in these circumstances, theory which could not be involved for molecular gases yields results no more inaccurate than the observations. We include therefore in Fig. 1 the most elaborate theoretical values to date (Taylor and Burke, 1976; Pradhan, 1978).

This may be seen by comparing Fig. 1 with Fig. 7. These results suggest that under certain conditions in flow drift tube experiments, Teff given by Eq. (28a) is significant in determining the vibrational as well as translational temperature and that the variation of the reaction rate with Teff above 1000 K is due mainly to vibrational excitation. It is not possible to say, however, how general these conclusions are, based as they are on a single reaction only. Further reactions of major importance are those between N 2 and O, N2+ + o ► NO+ + N, ► o+ + N 2 , (35a) (35b) which have been studied experimentally by McFarland et al.

Thus, for the N 2 reaction only N 2 ions were observed as reaction products; 0 + ( 4 S) from quenching and N O + from the reaction 0 + (2D) + N2 > NO++N (39) were not seen. Their rate of production is certainly < 10% of that for the charge exchange reaction. Similarly, for the 0 2 reaction no quenching could be observed and was certainly < 10% of the total. Rowe et al. (1980) measured the rates of the same two reactions using a flow drift tube and obtained results agreeing very well with those of Johnsen and Biondi.

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